New book on African Data Privacy Laws

A new book—African Data Privacy Laws (ed) Alex Makulilo— has been recently published by Springer. This volume presents analyses of data protection systems in 20 jurisdictions in Africa. In addition, it covers all sub-regional and regional data privacy policies in Africa including the recently adopted African Union Cyber Security and Data Protection Convention 2014.
Apart from analysing data protection law, the book focuses on the socio-economic contexts, political settings and legal culture in which privacy laws developed and operate in Africa. It bases its analyses on the African legal culture and comparative international data privacy law. This book promises to be a valuable source of literature about privacy and data protection law in Africa and its recent developments of which I am happy to have contributed the chapter on Nigeria.

MAPPING Second General Assembly, 31 Oct – 02 Nov 2016, Prague

Online Business, Security and Fundamental Human Rights – Enabling Trust on the Internet

On the last day of the European Cyber Security Month (ECSM)[i], October 31, 2016, the MAPPING Second General Assembly, focused on the interrelated issues Internet governance, Privacy and Intellectual Property Rights, is starting in Prague (CZ). The international debate includes a variety of topics, such as: existing and emerging business models as impacted by the General Data Protection Regulation, law enforcement and Intelligence agency perspectives; the interplay between privacy and intellectual property, critical infrastructures and challenges to freedom of expression.

Weiterlesen

EVIDENCE Final Conference took place

On the 29th and 30th of September the Evidence Final Conference took place in The Hague. The EVIDENCE project aims at establishing a common European Framework in the domain of digital evidence by providing a road map, consisting of guidelines, technical standards and recommendations to ensure a framework for the application of new technologies in the collection, use and exchange of evidence. As the field of digital evidence is quickly changing and technology is constantly developing, part of the project’s work is to consider legal solutions to ensure an effective criminal investigation and at the same time respecting European values as well as fundamental rights.

Since March 2014 the Institute of Legal Information Theory and Techniques at the National Research Council (CNR-ITTIG) in Italy under the lead of Dr. Maria Angela Biasiotti coordinates the project and thus exchange of knowledge and experience with several project partners, among them the Leibniz Universität Hannover/IRI. On Thursday, 29th Biasiotti gave her welcome speech in front of more than 90 people, which attended seven sessions leading to the final presentation of the EVIDENCE Road Map. The introducing presentations were given by the project partners followed by panel discussions of external experts.

Joseph A. Cannataci, University of Groningen, started with chairing a session on “The State of Electronic Evidence in Europe”, followed by a presentation about “Building Bridges between Different Actors” by Sabine Berghs, a Legal Officer at Interpol, which set the scene for session II chaired by Caroline Goemans-Dorny.

Christian M. Hawellek, research associate at the Institute for Legal Informatics, highlighted the privacy, data protection and international law dimensions of Evidence, which necessarily need to be taken into account, within the session on “Enhancing International Legal Cooperation” that was chaired by Professor Dr. Nikolaus Forgó. Sabine Berghs and Mattia Epifani, CNR-ITTIG, held a presentation on certification and professionalization opening the last session of Day I.

The next day, Fabrizio Turchi from the CNR-ITTIG provided an insight into the Evidence Project Tools Catalogue and the validation, followed by Mattia Epifani introducing “Setting Standards for Representing and Exchanging Evidence”. In the course of the project, a first prototype (proof of concept) of an evidence exchange application was developed that was presented by Nikolaos Matskanis, Centre of Excellence in Information and Communication Technologies (CETIC).

The conference has been the final get-together after 30 months of constant research, development and networking. Interested readers can find further information on the project website, www.evidenceproject.eu.

CARISMAND SCM and Review Meeting

The CARISMAND Steering Committee Meeting will take place on the 26th-27th October 2016. A Review of the project will follow on the 28th in Malta.

About CARISMAND

CARISMAND – Culture And RISkmanagement in Man-made And Natural Disasters

As risks are not “objective” but socially and culturally constructed, disaster management which is aware, respects,and makes use of local cultural aspects will be not only more effective but, at the same time, also improve the community’s disaster coping capacities. CARISMAND is setting out to identify these factors, to explore existing gaps and opportunities for improvement of disaster policies and procedures, and to develop a comprehensive toolkit which will allow professional as well as voluntary disaster managers to adopt culturally-aware everyday practices. This goal will be achieved by approaching the links, and gaps, between disaster management, culture and risk perception from the broadest possible multi-disciplinary perspective and, simultaneously, developing a feedback-loop between disaster management stakeholders and citizens to establish, test, and refine proposed solutions for culturally-informed best practices in disaster management. Whilst experts from a variety of fields (in particular legal, IT, cognitive science, anthropology, psychology, sociology) will undertake a comprehensive collation of existing knowledge and structures, a number of Citizen Summits and Stakeholder Assemblies will be organised. Systematically, CARISMAND will use an approach that examines natural, man-made and technical disasters, placing at the centre of attention specific aspects that affect culturally informed risk perceptions, eg whether disasters are caused intentionally or not, the different “visibility” of hazards, and various time scales of disasters such as slow/fast onset and short- and long-term effects. By organising six Citizen Summits (two per disaster category per year in two separate locations) where such disaster risks are prevalent , and three Stakeholder Assemblies (one per year) where the results are discussed through a wide crosssectional knowledge transfer between disaster managers from different locations as well as from different cultural backgrounds.